Tag Archives: New Hampshire

What @CPAsteve says about New Hampshire business tax returns (Video)

CPAsteve explains how the Business Profit Tax, Business Enterprise Tax, and Interest/Dividends Tax all work in New Hampshire and whether your small business needs to be concerned about it.

 

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Copyright 2014 by Steven A Feinberg (@CPAsteve) of Appletree Business Services LLC, a PASBA member accountant, located in Londonderry, New Hampshire, with more than twenty- five years experience on Federal and New Hampshire issues affecting small business, and specializes in keeping his clients OnTrack with bookkeeping, tax, and payroll services for a fixed monthly fee. Learn more about Steve’s exclusive SIX Step system developed for small businesses at www.appletreebusiness.com/map.

NH Small Business Owners Brace Yourself…Let’s talk Taxes in 2014

We have plenty of tax issues and challenges to reducing our taxes coming in 2014, particularly if you are a higher income taxpayer.

 

The following issues are concerns that may impact you and your company’s tax liability in the new year.

  • Small Business Health Insurance Credit – The tax credit to small employers (25 or fewer equivalent full-time employees) that provide an affordable health insurance plan for their employees and supplement at least half the premiums, will increase to 50% of the employer’s contribution in 2014, up from 35% in 2013. For non-profit employers, the credit will be 35% in 2014.

 

  • Net Investment Income Tax – As part of the Patient Protection & Affordable Care Act (the new health care legislation sometimes referred to as “Obamacare”), a new tax kicked in for 2013 and will continue in 2014 and beyond. It is a surtax levied on the net investment income of taxpayers in the higher-income brackets. And although it is perceived as an additional tax on higher-income taxpayers, it can affect even those who normally don’t have higher income if they have a large income from the sale of real estate, certain business assets, stocks, or other investments. This is on top of the 20% long-term capital gain tax rate now in effect for higher-income taxpayers.

 

  • Higher Tax Rates – Prior to the increase in 2013, there were six tax brackets: 10, 15, 25, 28, 33, and 35%. Beginning in 2013 and continuing for future years, a new top rate of 39.6% has been added for higher-income taxpayers.

 

  • Higher Capital Gains Rates – Beginning in 2013 and continuing for future years, the tax rate for long-term capital gains and qualified dividends has been increased to 20% (up from 15%) for taxpayers with incomes exceeding the threshold for their filing status.

 

  • Medical Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) Phase-out – Beginning in 2013 and continuing for future years, a taxpayer’s medical deductions will be reduced by 10% of their AGI, up from the previous 7.5% (but the 7.5% continues to apply to seniors through 2016).

 

  • Possibility of Lower Expensing Deductions – The Sec 179 business expensing allowance for business equipment drops from $500,000 per year to $25,000 in 2014 unless Congress extends the more liberal amount.(1)

 

  • Bonus Depreciation Expires – Beginning in 2014, the 50% bonus depreciation for tangible business assets will expire unless Congress extends it.(1) This also reduces the first-year maximum depreciation deduction for business autos and small trucks.

 

  • Individual Insurance Mandate – Beginning in 2014, the Patient Protection & Affordable Care Act will impose the new requirement that U.S. persons, with certain exceptions, have minimum essential health care insurance, or face a penalty.

 

  • Large Employer Mandatory Insurance Requirement – Originally scheduled to begin in 2014 but delayed until 2015 because the government did not have the reporting mechanisms in place, large employers, generally those with 50 or more full-time equivalent employees in the prior calendar year.

 

  • Simplified Home Office Deduction – Effective for tax years beginning in 2013 and continuing for 2014 and beyond, taxpayers can elect a simplified deduction for the business use of the taxpayer’s home. The deduction is $5 per square foot with a maximum square footage of 300. Thus, the maximum deduction is $1,500 per year. Eligibility qualifications are the same whether the simplified or regular deduction is claimed.

 

  • Increased Payroll and Self-Employment Tax – As part of the new health care legislation, higher-income taxpayers are faced with an additional 0.9% health insurance (HI) tax. Starting in 2013, and continuing for future years, this surtax is imposed upon wage earners and self-employed taxpayers whose wage and self-employment income exceeds $250,000 for married taxpayers filing jointly ($125,000 if filing separately) and $200,000 for all others.

 

  • Pease Limitations – The Pease limitation on itemized deductions that was reinstated in 2013 will continue for 2014. The Pease limitation phases out certain itemized deductions for higher-income taxpayers.

 

  • Phase-out of Exemptions – The phase-out of exemptions for higher-income taxpayers that was reinstated in 2013 continues for 2014.

 

  • Longer Depreciation Life for Leasehold and Restaurant Property – The current 15-year depreciable life will increase to 39 years in 2014.(1).

 

  • Qualified Small Business Stock Gain Exclusion – Beginning for qualified small business stock issued in 2014, the gain exclusion drops from 100% to 50%

 

  • Qualified Real Property Expensing – Congress temporarily permitted the use of the Sec 179 expensing deduction to write off certain leasehold improvements, and restaurant and retail property improvements. Without Congressional intervention, this provision will no longer be available in 2014.

 

(1) Congress, a few years back, engaged in brinkmanship with last-minute tax changes. Normally, they have managed to finalize tax law by year’s end. However, for 2013, they adjourned without addressing the issue of extending many tax breaks that were set to expire at the end of 2013. It is not known if these tax provisions will be extended or not.

 

If you found this article useful, please do not keep this a secret. Share it with a friend.

 

Copyright 2014 by Steven A Feinberg (@CPAsteve) of Appletree Business Services LLC, a PASBA member accountant, located in Londonderry, New Hampshire, with more than twenty- five years experience on Federal and New Hampshire issues affecting small business, and specializes in keeping his clients OnTrack with bookkeeping, tax, and payroll services for a fixed monthly fee. Learn more about Steve’s exclusive SIX Step system developed for small businesses at www.appletreebusiness.com/map.

NH rules on Independent Contractors vs Employees

First, why do you care about whether your help is a sub or an employee? Because you can push the tax burden onto the contractor rather than deal with payroll and you can avoid having to pay workers compensation insurance on those contractors,  Or can you?

 

In a nutshell, here is what the state says:

In New Hampshire, the party you are HIRING is a subcontractor and NOT an employee if ALL of the following are TRUE:

1- The hired party possesses or has applied for a federal employer identification number or social security number

 

2- The hired party has control and discretion over the means and manner of performance of the work

 

3- The hired party has control over the time when the work is performed and the time of performance is not dictated by the employer. However, this shall not prohibit the employer from reaching an agreement with the person as to completion schedule, range of work hours, and maximum number of work hours to be provided, and in the case of entertainment, the time such entertainment is to be presented.

 

4- The hired party hires and pays the person’s assistants, if any, and to the extent such assistants are employees, supervises the details of the assistants’ work.

 

5- The hired party holds himself or herself out to be in business for themself or is registered with the state as a business and the person has continuing or recurring business liabilities or obligations.

 

6- The hired party is responsible for satisfactory completion of work and may be held contractually responsible for failure to complete the work, AND

 

7- The hired party is not required to work exclusively for the employer.

 

 

Are you confident the people you are hiring qualify as Independent Contractors? We deal with issues like this all the time and can give you some really good advice on how to survive a challenge. Let us help you get confidence today.

 

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Copyright 2014 by Steven A Feinberg (@CPAsteve) of Appletree Business Services LLC, a PASBA member accountant, located in Londonderry, New Hampshire, with more than twenty- five years experience on Federal and New Hampshire issues affecting small business, and specializes in keeping his clients OnTrack with bookkeeping, tax, and payroll services for a fixed monthly fee. Learn more about Steve’s exclusive SIX Step system developed for small businesses at www.appletreebusiness.com/map.

Using a Payroll Service? Read this..

Many employers outsource their payroll and related tax duties to third-party payers such as payroll service providers (such as Appletree).

 

Reputable third-party payers can help employers streamline their business operations by collecting and timely depositing payroll taxes on the employer’s behalf and filing required payroll tax returns with state and federal authorities.

 

Here are some things you should know:

 

1) Are payroll taxes impounded by your payroll service, meaning are the tax monies pulled from your bank account and put into the payroll service’s bank account until due?

 

2) If you get a letter from the IRS about payroll taxes you believe you paid, you should contact the IRS YOURSELF; since this could indicate a much bigger problem.

 

3) Become familiar with the tax due dates that apply to employers of your size, try to keep track of these dates.

 

The key issue here is that you, the employer, are ultimately responsible for the payments even if the third party agent misappropriates the funds.

 

Are you certain about how your payroll taxes are being handled?

 

If you found this article useful, please do not keep this a secret. Share it with a friend.

 

Copyright 2014 by Steven A Feinberg (@CPAsteve) of Appletree Business Services LLC, a PASBA member accountant, located in Londonderry, New Hampshire, with more than twenty- five years experience on Federal and New Hampshire issues affecting small business, and specializes in keeping his clients OnTrack with bookkeeping, tax, and payroll services for a fixed monthly fee. Learn more about Steve’s exclusive SIX Step system developed for small businesses at www.appletreebusiness.com/map.

Taking advantage of employer tax benefits in your business

As a business owner in New Hampshire, make sure you’re getting these employer tax benefits benefits:

 

1) Dependent Care Benefits—If you incur childcare expenses so that you can work, you should check to see if your employer has a dependent care program. If dependent care benefits are provided by your employer under a qualified plan, you may be able to exclude up to $5,000 of child care expenses from your wages. 

 

2) Employer health care plans allow you to exclude the cost of insurance for you and your family from your wages.

 

3) If your NH employer has a 401(k) plan, you can elect to defer (pre-tax) a maximum of $17,500 for 2013. If you are 50 years or older, the maximum is increased to $23,000. These plans are especially beneficial when the employer provides a matching contribution. 

 

3) Flexible Spending Accounts—Some employers provide flexible spending accounts, which allow an employee to make contributions on a pre-tax salary reduction basis to provide coverage for up to $2,500 of medical and dental expenses. 

 

4) Tax-Free (income excludable) Employee Fringe Benefits—If the employer provides them, the law allows an exclusion from the employee’s taxable income for the following benefits:
 

(1) The cost of up to $50,000 of group-term life insurance.
 

(2) $245 (in 2013) per month for qualified parking.

 

(3) $245 (in 2013) per month for transit passes and commuter transportation.

 

(4) $20 per month for bicycle commuting expenses.

 

Are you getting all the tax free benefits you can out of your NH business? To learn more, check out Appletree Business Services’ Business Financial Confidence Map.

 

If you found this article useful, please do not keep this a secret. Share it with a friend.

 

Copyright 2014 by Steven A Feinberg (@CPAsteve) of Appletree Business Services LLC, a PASBA member accountant, located in Londonderry, New Hampshire, with more than twenty- five years experience on Federal and New Hampshire issues affecting small business, and specializes in keeping his clients OnTrack with bookkeeping, tax, and payroll services for a fixed monthly fee. Learn more about Steve’s exclusive SIX Step system developed for small businesses at www.appletreebusiness.com/map.

Taxes and Marijuana, Oh My!

So, Colorado just become another state in 2014 to legalize the sale of pot.

More and more states are legalizing the use of pot. I’ve even had a few people approach me about what might be involved in setting up a legitimate pot growing business in New Hampshire.

For one, it’s against the law in New Hampshire. But the big problem, if you  go and set yourself up in a ‘legitimate’ state, is that it is still against Federal law.

Let me explain why this is a problem for taxes.  Some might assume (what’s the big deal) that I’ll just set up my business  and make sure I pay my taxes..Simple enough?

Here’s the problem. Although you are required to report your income from whatever source, you are NOT entitled to take a single dollar of deduction against that income if the business is illegal.

So, if you had a pot growing business with $300,000 of gross sales, and you had $200,000 of expenses associated with it, you would have to pay taxes on the whole $300,000.

…and now you know…

 

If you found this article useful, please do not keep this a secret. Share it with a friend.

 

Copyright 2014 by Steven A Feinberg (@CPAsteve) of Appletree Business Services LLC, a PASBA member accountant, located in Londonderry, New Hampshire, with more than twenty- five years experience on Federal and New Hampshire issues affecting small business, and specializes in keeping his clients OnTrack with bookkeeping, tax, and payroll services for a fixed monthly fee. Learn more about Steve’s exclusive SIX Step system developed for small businesses at www.appletreebusiness.com/map.

How Will Health Care Reform Affect Your Business?

The Affordable Care Act (ACA for short) has left businesses and individuals confused about what the health care reform law contains and how it affects them. Even the accountants are confused!

My challenge in this article is to give you the kindergarten primer, and maybe share one little tidbit you did not know already. So here goes:

1 – Insurance companies have  new requirements. For example, they cannot refuse coverage due to pre-existing conditions, preventive services must be covered with no out-of-pocket costs, young adults can stay on parents’ policies until age 26, and lifetime dollar limits on health benefits are not permitted.

2 – The law mandates health insurance coverage for ALL individuals. If you’re one of the 45 million or so Americans without health insurance, you will need to get coverage for 2014 or pay a penalty of $95 or 1% of your income, whichever is greater. Low-income individuals may qualify for subsidies and/or tax credits to help pay the cost of insurance.

It is my humble opinion that $95 per person is not really enough, at least for 2014, to convince people to buy insurance. So I’m suggesting that if you don’t have insurance now, it could make sense because of SO much confusion in the health care marketplace, to just watch everyone else make fools of themselves.

Tremendous media attention is focused on the health insurance exchanges or “Marketplace” that opened for business on October 1. The media has left many people thinking everyone has to deal with the exchanges. The fact is that if you are covered by Medicare, Medicaid, or an employer-provided plan, you don’t need to do anything.

Many individuals will qualify for federal tax credits which will reduce the premiums they actually pay. Each state’s Marketplace will have a calculator to assist individuals in determining the amount, if any, of their federal tax credit.

3 – For businesses with 50 or more full-time employees, the requirement to provide “affordable, minimum essential coverage” to employees has been delayed for one year and is not required until 2015. Originally, employers had been required to file information returns that reported details about the health insurance they provided, with penalties to apply if the insurance did not meet standards. Companies complained that they needed more time to meet the reporting obligations, and in response the IRS made the reporting requirement optional for 2014. Without the reporting, the IRS could not determine penalties, so the penalties also were postponed for a year.

Bottom line: The IRS is encouraging companies to comply in 2014 even though there are no penalties for failure to do so.

4 – Businesses with fewer than 50 employees are encouraged to provide insurance for their employees, but there are no penalties for failing to do so. A special marketplace will be available for businesses with 50 or fewer employees, allowing them to buy health insurance through the Small Business Health Options Program (SHOP), but the implementation of SHOP has now been delayed a full year, meaning you’ll just need to keep talking with your current insurance broker.

5 – Businesses with fewer than 25 employees that pay at least 50% of the health insurance premiums for their employees may be eligible for a tax credit for as much as 35% of the cost of the premiums. To qualify, the business must employ fewer than 25 full-time people with average wages of less than $50,000. For 2014, the maximum credit increases to 50% of the premiums the company pays, though to qualify for the credit, the insurance must be purchased through SHOP (or a broker authorized to offer SHOP insurance that is in compliance with the Affordable Care act.

6 – Businesses who DO NOT have a group insurance plan set up for their business can no longer use a SECTION 125 employee plan for deducting qualified medical insurance premiums and expenses on a pre-tax bases. This doesn’t affect dental, vision or dependent care expenses allowed in a 125 plan.

Anyway, confusion continues.

 

If you found this article useful, please do not keep this a secret. Share it with a friend.

 

Copyright 2014 by Steven A Feinberg (@CPAsteve) of Appletree Business Services LLC, a PASBA member accountant, located in Londonderry, New Hampshire, with more than twenty- five years experience on Federal and New Hampshire issues affecting small business, and specializes in keeping his clients OnTrack with bookkeeping, tax, and payroll services for a fixed monthly fee. Learn more about Steve’s exclusive SIX Step system developed for small businesses at www.appletreebusiness.com/map.

Small Businesses – Keep your health insurance broker on your holiday card list

Businesses with fewer than 50 employees are encouraged to provide insurance for their employees, but there are no penalties for failing to do so.

A special marketplace will be available for businesses with 50 or fewer employees, allowing them to buy health insurance through the Small Business Health Options Program (SHOP), but the implementation of SHOP has now been delayed a full year.

You’ll just need to keep talking with your current insurance broker.

To learn more about these kinds of options and to see what they can do for your business, check out the Appletree Business Services Business Financial Confidence Map here.

 

If you found this article useful, please do not keep this a secret. Share it with a friend.

 

Copyright 2014 by Steven A Feinberg (@CPAsteve) of Appletree Business Services LLC, a PASBA member accountant, located in Londonderry, New Hampshire, with more than twenty- five years experience on Federal and New Hampshire issues affecting small business, and specializes in keeping his clients OnTrack with bookkeeping, tax, and payroll services for a fixed monthly fee. Learn more about Steve’s exclusive SIX Step system developed for small businesses at www.appletreebusiness.com/map.

Tax Bills for 2013 may be a shocker

Higher income taxpayers are in for a real shocker this year when they get their tax bills.. Higher tax rates, new net investment income tax, additional payroll and self-employment taxes, the phase-out of exemptions, and itemized deductions all spell big tax increases. For some taxpayers the impact can be quite significant.

However, it may not be too late to improve your situation with some year-end planning, and the sooner the better. Options include taking advantage of unrealized losses, business expensing, tax credits, delaying certain deductions and tax prepayments, income deferral, and other techniques.

Do you know if or how this affects your business? Get confidence today by having us review your situation. Take a look at our Business Financial Confidence Map here.

 

 

If you found this article useful, please do not keep this a secret. Share it with a friend.

 

Copyright 2014 by Steven A Feinberg (@CPAsteve) of Appletree Business Services LLC, a PASBA member accountant, located in Londonderry, New Hampshire, with more than twenty- five years experience on Federal and New Hampshire issues affecting small business, and specializes in keeping his clients OnTrack with bookkeeping, tax, and payroll services for a fixed monthly fee. Learn more about Steve’s exclusive SIX Step system developed for small businesses at www.appletreebusiness.com/map.

When A Shareholder Agreement Pays! (Video)

Ever end up in a situation where you and your business partner are engaged in your business with different levels of time and energy? Is it time to get more confidence in how and how MUCH you get paid?

 

Check out this short clip with Steve Feinberg (AKA CPAsteve) and learn the value and the necessity of a new Shareholder Agreement. You can get more information like this by looking at our Business Financial Confidence Map.

 

If you found this article useful, please do not keep this a secret. Share it with a friend.

 

Copyright 2014 by Steven A Feinberg (@CPAsteve) of Appletree Business Services LLC, a PASBA member accountant, located in Londonderry, New Hampshire, with more than twenty- five years experience on Federal and New Hampshire issues affecting small business, and specializes in keeping his clients OnTrack with bookkeeping, tax, and payroll services for a fixed monthly fee. Learn more about Steve’s exclusive SIX Step system developed for small businesses at www.appletreebusiness.com/map.